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Big Boy Bear
In the summer of 2014 we received a call from people in a small town within an hour's drive of the shelter.  They said there was a Newfoundland living on a chain, and he was matted, filthy, and miserable.  They asked if we could do anything to help this dog. HUA representatives drove to thehome right away.  Big Boy Bear was chained to an old shed.  He had a huge collar around his neck attached to the heavy chain.  He had worn a dirt circle as far as the chainwould reach in an area of tall weeds.  He had a dog house that he could not get into.       When he was approached with kind words and treats, he seemed amiable but then suddenly lunged at a staff member, fiercely growling and snapping. BB Bear's owners were elderly people who were physically unable to handle him, but they did not want to relinquish him.  They did agree that the poor dog needed immediate care, and they agreed to let HUA help him.
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Broken Hearts from Louisiana
On October 13th, thirty eight dogs flew into Nebraska City from a flood-ravaged parish in southern Louisiana. These dogs had been in overcrowded shelters and when the flood waters hit, rescuers were forced to hastily make room for newly displaced dogs who had some hope of finding their families. If not, our precious cargo surely would have been euthanized. This rescue was different for the folks at HUA--no sick and terrified puppy mill dogs, no dogs abandoned or dumped, or no cases of abuse or neglect.  We met a happy, silly, bouncy bunch of pups ready to conquer the world! 
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October 13th Was a Beautiful Day
On the morning of October 13th, the HUA shelter received 38 very special deliveries.  Thanks in great part to Captain Peter Rork, co-founder of Dog Is My CoPilot (DIMC), and Take Paws Rescue in Louisiana, we were able to save these precious lives from certain death in over-crowded shelters in southern Louisiana.  The disastrous floods in August left hundreds of thousands of people and animals homeless.  Shelters were already bursting at the seams and the devastation put them far beyond capacity.  Stories in the news spoke of fast rising river waters causing animal shelters to hastily evacuate.  Horrified workers had no choice but to release dogs from kennels to let them swim onto rooftops. Foster homes were flooded as well and good people who adored their animals were forced to flee for their lives. The passage of the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards after Hurricane Katrina allows rescuers to save pets as they would people, but the numbers were staggering.
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